KFIV and KTRB Personality, Derek Waring

I suppose I first became interested in radio back in the late 50’s when I would visit KTRB and sing on the Tots ‘N Teens program with my cousins John and Cheryl Wylie. I recall how friendly Cal Purviance was and also remember Glenn Staley who played the piano. But most of all, I remember how much the studio intrigued me. This was show business! I often wish that I would have had the chance to be involved during radio’s heydays when major productions were done in the studios.

My desire to pursue radio also got a boost from the visits that I made to Bob Pinheiro’s home as a child. Bob who is now the Modesto Radio Museum Webmaster lived near me. He was, and still is, very much into Ham Radio and he happily shared his knowledge with me. Little did he know that he was lighting a fire that would lead me into broadcasting. I also recall riding the bus to school while attending La Loma Junior High School and listening to Bobby Barnett, Gary Culver, and Fred Green on KFIV. I thought, man this stinks; I have to go to school and these guys are having a blast talking and playing music on the radio.

I became seriously interested in the field of broadcasting as a profession while a student at Modesto Junior College (MJC). Originally I had planned to major in Journalism but happened to visit the MJC radio station one day. I was hooked! My professors during those early days had a big influence on me, Bill Hill, Sid Woodward, Max Sayre, Harley Lee, and Donald Rowe. They really laid down a good foundation for me.

While I was attending MJC I obtained my Radio Telephone Third Class license and worked at KSRT, Stereo 101, a small station in Tracy, CA. There was an older fellow at KSRT, Ken Hill, who took me under his wing and mentored me. I’ve always been thankful for the direction that Ken gave to me at a time that I was pretty green and didn’t really have a clue. After our stints on the air Ken and I would go fishing in the Delta Mendota canal and he would answer all my questions about radio. Ken, wherever you are, thanks. I don’t really know how many listeners I had while at KSRT. I do know that my mom loved my show!

After spending some time at KSRT I realized that if I wanted to have a career in radio, I needed to get my Radio Telephone First Class license. I traveled to Long Beach with Mike Novak another local guy who went into broadcasting. We attended William B. Ogden’s Radio Operational Engineering School in the summer of 1969. I watched the First Man on The Moon telecast from Ogden’s classroom. I have lots of good memories from my time at Ogden’s. I made some friends with whom I still have contact, Bob Lang and Mark Holste (Taylor).

After returning from Ogden’s in 1969 Bob De Leon, who was program director at KFIV (K-5), hired me.

Derek with Bob DeLeon, lifetime friends.

I started on the all night shift but eventually worked all of the time slots. I had some great times at K-5 at a time that the station was the only Top 40 rocker in the area. Some of the individuals with whom I had the privilege of working were Bob De Leon, Johnny Walker (Bob Neutzling), Tony Townsend (Tony Flores), Roy Williams, John Huey, Mark Taylor (Mark Holste), Mike Shannon, and John Chappell. Bob Fenton was the owner of K-5 at that time and when he spoke to us we    were always referred to as “Kid.”

My favorite times at K-5 were when I got to count down the weekly top 40. There are also some funny stories that I could never share in public. Bob De Leon and I left K-5 at about the same time and went to KTRB. I think this happened around 1972. KTRB was an adult contemporary format which allowed us to insert more of our personalities into our programs. Bob Lang was doing mid mornings at KTRB, Tim St. Martin was doing the news, Cal Purviance was doing early mornings, Bob De Leon did the afternoons, and I had the evening shift. Don Schneider was doing mobile news from his car we called the “porcupine” because of all of the antennas. We even had an occasional report from the air. These were really good times in radio. I felt that the station was part of the community and we were part of a broadcasting team. Sam Horrell was the program director at the time. Sam’s influence created an atmosphere of camaraderie at KTRB.

There are also many stories from my days at KTRB. One of the things that I remember well is that from the production booth across the hall from the on-air studio one could talk into the earphones.

Down through the decades, the voice stays young

I have fond memories of Bob Lang interviewing my daughter Kristy on the air. She was a toddler at the time. Not only were the on-air personalities close, there was a special relationship with the sales staff and the front office personnel. We were a family. Around this time I also worked weekends at KJOY in Stockton. I remember getting off the air at KTRB at 11:00 p.m. driving to Stockton and going on the air at 12:00 midnight at KJOY working until 7:00 in the morning. My drives home after getting off were quite interesting. I’m happy to still be here.

In the mid 70’s KTRB was sold and the program changes that were made had a “not so positive” impact on the image and the morale of those working at KTRB. The on-air personalities were made to change their names. Bob Lang became Big Ben Boulder, Bob De Leon became Johnny Gunn, and my new name was the Godfather. Radio had changed; it was becoming impersonal and moving further away from its local audience. I can’t say that these developments single handedly pointed me in a different direction as far as my career was concerned but they played a major role. I went back to college and followed a path that eventually led to being a college administrator. Along that path I did work as a part time disk jockey for top 40, country, and talk radio because radio was in my blood, and it still is after these many years.

Here is a sample of Derek on the air: 

     

MICROPHONE MAN

Note-This page is under renovation.  We will  have it up in a few weeks.

Part 1

Microphones have been around since Alexander Graham Bell invented the telephone. In radio, television and recording, the microphone is the the very first instrument used in the process of picking up sound. So the “mike” is

The Microphone Man , Gary Avey.

pretty important and went through development from relatively primitive devices in the early days to units that could very faithfully reproduce the full range of humanly audible sound.

In this segment I want to concentrate on those broadcast-type microphones that had a huge impact on the industry from the early 1930s through the 1960s.

Here is one of the most recognizable broadcast and recording microphones made in the USA. The RCA model 44 series. These were first developed back in the 1930s by Harry Olson of RCA Labs in Camden New Jersey.

 

Original 44A-1

The first in this series was the 44A. The model 44 microphones were called “ribbon-velocity” microphones because the internal workings were comprised of a thin corrugated aluminum element, called a “ribbon” suspended in a strong permanent magnet field.

This ribbon was the generating element taking sound waves and generating a tiny electrical current that was an exact representation of the sound. This small signal was stepped up by a transformer so it could be sent down the cable to the equipment it was connected to.

The basic ribbon-velocity microphone has a bi-directional pickup pattern. That means that it picks up sound equally well from the front and back of the mike but is relatively dead to sound arriving from either side.

This pick up pattern was very useful in the so called “golden age” of radio…especially in dramatic programs where several actors could be grouped around the mike. There could be two or three actors facing the front side and another group facing the back side of the ribbon mike and all would be picked up equally well.

If the script called for someone to walk into a scene the actor would move from one of the dead sides of the mike to a live side providing a perfect “fade-in” The same could be done in reverse for a “fade-out”.

Screen removed to show inner workings including the corrugated aluminum ribbon element.

Radio announcers always loved ribbon mikes because they tended to make the voice sound more “bassy” or deep sounding when worked closeup. One of the problems with this is that the ribbon element was very fragile and could be easily stretched by a blast of breath from a close-talking announcer. This also caused a big “pop” in the audio. RCA recommended a working distance of a foot or more for ribbon mikes….of course this was predicated on having a well designed studio with proper acoustics!

The RCA 44 series of microphones were manufactured from the early 30s to 1958. They went through several updates ending with the 44B

The RCA 44s were used by all the major radio and TV networks, local radio and TV stations, as well as recording studios. They were excellent for music pickup as well as voice. The 44 is a heavy weight in more ways than one….it weighed in at 8 pounds!! Obviously the 44 was not intended as a hand mike! Also it could not be used outdoors where wind was a factor and the big warning for any user of a ribbon mike was….”don’t ever blow into it”!

CBS modified this 44a with a Cannon “P” connector on the rear.

These mikes are still in demand and have seen a resurgence in recent years with digital recording. Although RCA stopped making microphones about 1973, there are ribbon mikes being manufactured new today by many makers here in the US as well as China and Russia. The ribbon mike has a very smooth, mellow sound that is very pleasing to the ear.

You can find old RCA 44 ribbon mikes selling on Ebay for up to several thousand dollars. This is a testament to the enduring quality of these units even after over 50 years since they stopped being manufactured. The amazing thing is you could have bought a brand new 44BX in 1957 for $129…of course, that’s in 1957 dollars!

There is a company in Pasadena, Audio Engineering Associates, that makes an exact replica of the RCA 44 called the AEA 44…..They sell for around $4,000. Some of the biggest recording studios are using these modern replicas in music productions of all kinds today.

So that’s the brief story of the RCA model 44. For more info on this and many other microphones, I recommend Stan Coutant’s website www.coutant.org. Stan has pictures and specs and also audio sound bites to give you an idea of how various mikes sound.

In future posts I’ll review other great broadcast mikes like the RCA 77 and the Western Electric/Altec 639 “birdcage” and several more.

Part 3

Our previous sessions have dealt with ribbon microphones by RCA, one of the two prime makers of broadcast and sound equipment in the mid 20th century. This time we’ll turn to the other of these major makers, Western Electric Company.

RCA and Western Electric were fierce competitors in this era. I think I am safe in saying that the majority of radio stations from the 1920s through around 1950 used either RCA or Western Electric equipment, or a combination of both. Western Electric was the manufacturing arm of Bell Telephone…but also made broadcast equipment designed by Bell Telephone Labs. In 1949 Federal anti-trust laws forced Western Electric to divest of their broadcasting equipment manufacturing. Both these companies made just about everything needed to equip a station from microphones and audio control to transmitters and antennas.

About the time RCA came out with the revolutionary ribbon microphone…Western Electric developed the first high-quality dynamic microphone. The dynamic uses the same basic principle as the ribbon….a moving conductor in a magnetic field to generate the audio signal from sound waves. Instead of a moving foil ribbon…the dynamic uses a round-shaped diaphragm that has a coil of wire attached that moves in the magnetic field…it’s a small electric generator. Another way of explaining a dynamic microphone is to think of it as a loudspeaker in reverse! A loudspeaker takes a signal from a radio receiver or amplifier and turns that electric signal into sound we can hear. A microphone, as we explained before, takes that sound we hear and translates it into an electrical signal so it can be amplified and sent to a loudspeaker, as in a PA system, or for broadcasting or recording.

Western Electrics’ new dynamic microphone was dubbed the model 618 and came out about 1931. The model 618 was an omni-directional…or non-directional mike that was relatively small in size and very rugged…making it excellent for studio as well as remote broadcasting, especially in the outdoors. This mike was not sensitive to wind and breath noises like the ribbon mike…and it was relatively insensitive to handling noises making it excellent as a hand mike for interviews and such.

The model 618 was a great improvement over the earlier noisy carbon and bulky condenser mikes of that era. The 618 was a big hit with the radio industry and these mikes were used clear into the 50s. RCA, of course, would not be left behind by Western Electric….so they shortly came out with a very similar-looking mike they called the model 50A. Internally the RCA model 50A used a slightly different way of imbedding the wire into the diaphragm so as not to infringe on Western Electrics’ patents….but externally they looked very similar.

You’ll see both of these mikes in news photos and newsreels of the day…they were used for President FDR’s “Fireside Chat” broadcasts. If you look closely at these photos you’ll see that CBS and Mutual (MBS) used the Western Electric and NBC and the Blue networks used the RCA because NBC was owned by RCA.

A few smaller manufacturers also made mikes that looked very much like the Western Electric and RCA units but these smaller outfits could not compete with the two giants in the broadcast industry and their mikes were used mainly in PA systems and some smaller radio stations.

The dynamic-type microphone is one of the most used units up to this very day…and Western Electric was the start of it all. These pioneering mikes were all omni-directional….picking up sounds from all around…later a small company, at the time, named Shure Brothers designed the first uni-directional dynamic mike called the “Unidyne”. Most dynamic mikes today are uni-directional picking up sound from the front side of the microphone and rejecting sounds from the rear, thus preventing sound system feedback (howling) and eliminating background noises, and all based on Shure’s ground-breaking development of the late 1930s.

We’ll save that story for another session.

 

Spec sheet for the WE 618 4

 

 

 

Page 2

Our previous sessions have dealt with ribbon microphones by RCA, one of the two prime makers of broadcast and sound equipment in the mid 20th century. This time we’ll turn to the other of these major makers, Western Electric Company.

RCA and Western Electric were fierce competitors in this era. I think I am safe in saying that the majority of radio stations from the 1920s through around 1950 used either RCA or Western Electric equipment, or a combination of both. Western Electric was the manufacturing arm of Bell Telephone…but also made broadcast equipment designed by Bell Telephone Labs. In 1949 Federal anti-trust laws forced Western Electric to divest of their broadcasting equipment manufacturing. Both these companies made just about everything needed to equip a station from microphones and audio control to transmitters and antennas.

About the time RCA came out with the revolutionary ribbon microphone…Western Electric developed the first high-quality dynamic microphone. The dynamic uses the same basic principle as the ribbon….a moving conductor in a magnetic field to generate the audio signal from sound waves. Instead of a moving foil ribbon…the dynamic uses a round-shaped diaphragm that has a coil of wire attached that moves in the magnetic field…it’s a small electric generator. Another way of explaining a dynamic microphone is to think of it as a loudspeaker in reverse! A loudspeaker takes a signal from a radio receiver or amplifier and turns that electric signal into sound we can hear. A microphone, as we explained before, takes that sound we hear and translates it into an electrical signal so it can be amplified and sent to a loudspeaker, as in a PA system, or for broadcasting or recording.

Western Electrics’ new dynamic microphone was dubbed the model 618 and came out about 1931. The model 618 was an omni-directional…or non-directional mike that was relatively small in size and very rugged…making it excellent for studio as well as remote broadcasting, especially in the outdoors. This mike was not sensitive to wind and breath noises like the ribbon mike…and it was relatively insensitive to handling noises making it excellent as a hand mike for interviews and such.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The model 618 was a great improvement over the earlier noisy carbon

 

and bulky condenser mikes of that era. The 618 was a big hit with the radio industry and these mikes were used clear into the 50s. RCA, of course, would not be left behind by Western Electric….so they shortly came out with a very similar-looking mike they called the model 50A. Internally the RCA model 50A used a slightly different way of embedding the wire into the diaphragm so as not to infringe on Western Electrics’ patents….but externally they looked very similar.

You’ll see both of these mikes in news photos and newsreels of the day…they were used for President FDR’s “Fireside Chat” broadcasts. If you look closely at these photos you’ll see that CBS and Mutual (MBS) used the Western Electric and NBC and the Blue networks used the RCA because NBC was owned by RCA.

A few smaller manufacturers also made mikes that looked very much like the Western Electric and RCA units but these smaller outfits could not compete with the two giants in the broadcast industry and their mikes were used mainly in PA systems and some smaller radio stations.

The dynamic-type microphone is one of the most used units up to this very day…and Western Electric was the start of it all. These pioneering mikes were all omni-directional….picking up sounds from all around…later a small company, at the time, named Shure Brothers designed the first uni-directional dynamic mike called the “Unidyne”. Most dynamic mikes today are uni-directional picking up sound from the front side of the microphone and rejecting sounds from the rear, thus preventing sound system feedback (howling) and eliminating background noises, and all based on Shure’s ground-breaking development of the late 1930s.

We’ll save that story for another session.

Spec sheet for the WE 618 4

 

 

KTRB Owner Bill Bates, 68

William H. (Bill) Bates, Jr. died Thursday April 3, 1969  of an apparent heart attack while at his daughter’s home in San Jose. He was 68 years old and had been ill and off work for the past three weeks. The apparent fatal heart attack occurred shortly after noon at the home of his daughter, Delores Williams in San Jose, He had been staying with her following his release from a hospital where he had been several weeks.  He was a native of Freedom, CA (Santa Cruz County).
Bates is survived by his widow, Maxine Bates; two daughters, Delores Williams and Carmelita Lockbaum, both of San Jose, and six grandchildren. Final rights were held at the Franklin and Downs Funeral home April 7, 1969  with the Rev. Donald G. Weston of St. Johns Chapel of the Valley officiating.   Interment was at Lakewood Memorial Park in Hughson.
 
 
 

Merle “Lee” MacKenzie, 73

Merle “Lee” MacKenzie

Merle “Lee” Mackenzie, a well-known valley radio personality, passed away January 17, 2018  in Modesto following a lengthy illness. He was 73.  Lee spent most of his life in local broadcasting, including radio stations KBEE, KEJC and KCIV.He was also an Amateur Radio Extra Class radio operator call sign WA6MLM.  He is survived by his wife, a son in San Antonio, TX  and four daughters.

Dwight Case, 90

Standing On The Shoulders Of Giants: Remembering Dwight Case

By  Radio Ink

Dwight Case was born in Modesto June 29, 1929. His career began at KFIV, Modesto and from there he was destined to change the landscape of the broadcasting industry in America.

Among his many accomplishments Dwight was the President of RKO Radio,  was Publisher and Editor of Radio & Records magazine, and was the founder of TRANSTAR, the first 24-hour satellite entertainment provider.  It was Dwight who was the first in the industry to put women in major positions.

“Dwight Case was a true leader and visionary of the radio industry. He had a profound impact on my career and on my love of radio. He opened up many doors for me both professionally and personally for which I will always be grateful. He supported me as a female in the industry when it was not fashionable or commonplace and helped me to find my voice. I look back on the many spirited conversations we have had over the years and can only hope we provided him as much inspiration and thought as he provided us.”– Erica Farber, CEO RAB, The Radio Advertising Bureau.   (Courtesy Radio Ink)

Look at all that food! Dwight doing a K-5 radio remote at Burge’s Drive In.
All the K-5 Cruisers cruised in to see Dwight!

 

Dwight, as General Manager of KROY, 1971

 

-Here is the full obituary, followed by a touching tribute to Modesto’s Dwight Case:

KMPH, 840 kHz History

KMPH A.M. 840 kHz Sold To Immaculate Heart Radio
August 1, 2014

Radio station KMPH, 840 KHz Modesto, California, was sold to Immaculate Heart Radio effective August 1, 2014 by owner Harry Pappas of Reno, NV. Pappas dropped their Graffiti Gold music format from the station with the consummation of the agreement and the new owners launched their Catholic talk radio format August 1, 2014. Immaculate Heart Radio stations broadcast authentic Catholic programming 24 hours a day over 31 group owned stations in six states including 15 translators. Stations including KWG, Stockton, KJOP, Lemoore, CA, KHOT, Madera, CA. and KJPG in Bakersfield, CA.

Meanwhile, the KTRB building and property on Norwegian Avenue is still for sale. There’ve been no no offers tendered for the property which was originally listed for sale over a year ago Harry Pappas, owner for $495,000. The price has been reduced $295,000 or best offer.

________________________
Vandals Attack KMPH
August 14, 2013
KMPH’s mobile office/studios located in the parking lot of the former KTRB on Norwegian Ave. in Modesto was struck sometime overnight Wednesday August 14, 2013 by vandals. The responsible’s cut a hole in the chain-link fence that surrounds the property to gain access the mobile office which sits in the parking lot of the former KTRB . They knocked the station off the air by cutting the power to the office and transmission wires connected to the building. No attempt was made to enter the alarmed mobile office itself. Initial damage estimates place a loss of around $500.

David Jackson, program director of the station, discovered the station off the air at 6 AM and contacted station engineer Paul Shinn who discovered the crime when he arrived at the station. The adjacent former KTRB building, which has been vacant for several years, has in the past been broken into several times mostly for copper wiring which was stripped from the interior. KMPH, owned by Harry Pappas of Reno, NV, plans to increase the security of the property. The incident was reported to the Modesto Police Department.

______________________________

KMPH Returns With Graffiti Gold

August 11, 2013

According to Manoli Pappas of the KMPH management team, KMPH has returned to the air with a “Graffiti Gold” music format.
______________________________
KMPH-AM Modesto Being Liquidated
Thursday, March 29, 2012

Pappas Telecasting is liquidating its broadcast holdings, which include TV stations in California, Texas, Arizona and Nebraska and one radio station KMPH-AM (840) in Modesto, CA. KMPH was launched by Harry J. Pappas to replace KTRB-AM (860) which he moved to San Francisco in 2006. KTRB San Francisco is not part of this liquidation. KMPH AM went into receivership when Pappas failed to make a March 26, 2012 “discounted payoff ” which would have allow the stations involved to “re-vest” with him as the original owner. However, lender Comerica Bank failed to receive payment. Pappas had been the initial trustee, managing it on behalf of the creditors. Pappas’ own stock in the company is now being contributed to the Liquidating Trust run by Shubert, under direction of the Federal bankruptcy court in Delaware.

KMPH 840 KHz replaced the original KTRB 860 KHz on July 10, 2006 when the Pappas Company, headed by Harry Pappas, moved KTRB to San Francisco. KMPH failed on August 31, 2010 but returned to the air in August of 2011 carrying Mexican religious programming being fed to the transmitter by satellite from a Texas company. Other than the contract engineer and a maintenance man, there are no local employees. Harry Pappas’s nephew Jim Pappas, a company VP, managed KMPH during the year it was on the air and moved on to hold the same position with KTRB in San Francisco. He currently is an account representative for the Valley Yellow Pages.

( Radio-Info.Com contributed to this story)

Thursday, March 29, 2012

Pappas Telecasting is liquidating its broadcast holdings, which include TV stations in California, Texas, Arizona and Nebraska and one radio station KMPH-AM (840) in Modesto, CA. KMPH was launched by Harry J. Pappas to replace KTRB-AM (860) which he moved to San Francisco in 2006. KTRB San Francisco is not part of this liquidation. KMPH AM went into receivership when Pappas failed to make a March 26, 2012 “discounted payoff ” which would have allow the stations involved to “re-vest” with him as the original owner. However, lender Comerica Bank failed to receive payment. Pappas had been the initial trustee, managing it on behalf of the creditors. Pappas’ own stock in the company is now being contributed to the Liquidating Trust run by Shubert, under direction of the Federal bankruptcy court in Delaware.

KMPH 840 KHz replaced the original KTRB 860 KHz on July 10, 2006 when the Pappas Company, headed by Harry Pappas, moved KTRB to San Francisco. KMPH failed on August 31, 2010 but returned to the air in August of 2011 carrying Mexican religious programming being fed to the transmitter by satellite from a Texas company. Other than the contract engineer and a maintenance man, there are no local employees. Harry Pappas’s nephew Jim Pappas, a company VP, managed KMPH during the year it was on the air and moved on to hold the same position with KTRB in San Francisco. He currently is an account representative for the Valley Yellow Pages.

KMPH A.M. 840 kHz Sold To Immaculate Heart Radio
August 1, 2014

Radio station KMPH, 840 KHz Modesto, California, was sold to Immaculate Heart Radio effective August 1, 2014 by owner Harry Pappas of Reno, NV. Pappas dropped their Graffiti Gold music format from the station with the consummation of the agreement and the new owners launched their Catholic talk radio format August 1, 2014. Immaculate Heart Radio stations broadcast authentic Catholic programming 24 hours a day over 31 group owned stations in six states including 15 translators. Stations including KWG, Stockton, KJOP, Lemoore, CA, KHOT, Madera, CA. and KJPG in Bakersfield, CA.

Meanwhile, the KTRB building and property on Norwegian Avenue is still for sale. There’ve been no no offers tendered for the property which was originally listed for sale over a year ago Harry Pappas, owner for $495,000. The price has been reduced $295,000 or best offer.

________________________
Vandals Attack KMPH
August 14, 2013
KMPH’s mobile office/studios located in the parking lot of the former KTRB on Norwegian Ave. in Modesto was struck sometime overnight Wednesday August 14, 2013 by vandals. The responsible’s cut a hole in the chain-link fence that surrounds the property to gain access the mobile office which sits in the parking lot of the former KTRB . They knocked the station off the air by cutting the power to the office and transmission wires connected to the building. No attempt was made to enter the alarmed mobile office itself. Initial damage estimates place a loss of around $500.

David Jackson, program director of the station, discovered the station off the air at 6 AM and contacted station engineer Paul Shinn who discovered the crime when he arrived at the station. The adjacent former KTRB building, which has been vacant for several years, has in the past been broken into several times mostly for copper wiring which was stripped from the interior. KMPH, owned by Harry Pappas of Reno, NV, plans to increase the security of the property. The incident was reported to the Modesto Police Department.

______________________________

KMPH Returns With Graffiti Gold

August 11, 2013

According to Manoli Pappas of the KMPH management team, KMPH has returned to the air with a “Graffiti Gold” music format.
______________________________
KMPH-AM Modesto Being Liquidated
Thursday, March 29, 2012

Pappas Telecasting is liquidating its broadcast holdings, which include TV stations in California, Texas, Arizona and Nebraska and one radio station KMPH-AM (840) in Modesto, CA. KMPH was launched by Harry J. Pappas to replace KTRB-AM (860) which he moved to San Francisco in 2006. KTRB San Francisco is not part of this liquidation. KMPH AM went into receivership when Pappas failed to make a March 26, 2012 “discounted payoff ” which would have allow the stations involved to “re-vest” with him as the original owner. However, lender Comerica Bank failed to receive payment. Pappas had been the initial trustee, managing it on behalf of the creditors. Pappas’ own stock in the company is now being contributed to the Liquidating Trust run by Shubert, under direction of the Federal bankruptcy court in Delaware.

KMPH 840 KHz replaced the original KTRB 860 KHz on July 10, 2006 when the Pappas Company, headed by Harry Pappas, moved KTRB to San Francisco. KMPH failed on August 31, 2010 but returned to the air in August of 2011 carrying Mexican religious programming being fed to the transmitter by satellite from a Texas company. Other than the contract engineer and a maintenance man, there are no local employees. Harry Pappas’s nephew Jim Pappas, a company VP, managed KMPH during the year it was on the air and moved on to hold the same position with KTRB in San Francisco. He currently is an account representative for the Valley Yellow Pages.

( Radio-Info.Com contributed to this story)

( Radio-Info.Com contributed to this story)

Former KFIV,KTRB, KMPH Personality Tim St. Martin

Longtime Modesto area radio listeners have heard a familiar voice on the local airwaves for more than 30 years — 32 1/2 years to be exact. Tim St. Martin, who began his career at Modesto’s KFIV in the spring of 1967, is still going strong as a disc jockey and news broadcaster at KJSN Sunny 102.3 FM. He shares the morning mike with Gary Michael and can be heard from 5:30 to 8:30 a.m. Mondays through Fridays.

The 53-year-old DJ, who grew up in Southgate in Southern California and went to broadcasting school in Hollywood, got his first job at KTHO, in South Lake Tahoe.” It was a good learning experience and a lot of fun for a 20-year-old but after one year I was offered a spot at KFIV” St. Martin said.

And so began his local career that very few can match or top, in terms of longevity or hours on the air. By his own estimate, he’s put in “about 20 thousand hours, maybe more.”

Perhaps only the legendary Cal Purviance can claim a longer tenure as an on-air personality. Purviance worked as a newsman and program director at KTRB full-time from 1951 to 1982. Even after retiring, he stayed on part-time until 1990.

Ironically, it was Purviance, who hired St. Martin away from KFIV in 1969 as Tim became KTRB’s newscaster, replacing Art Baker.  Purviance recalls St. Martin as being a “sure-fire” radio man.

“l hired Tim because of his fine on air personality and his nose for news” Purviance said. “He was very articulate and worked well with others. He never insisted on doing things his way only. He was with us a number of years and was a heckuva team player.”

St. Martin left the radio scene for a brief time in the seventies to enter private business. He tried his hand as a professional rodeo announcer and also worked as a yacht salesman in the Delta. But he soon found out that he yearned to get back into radio.

“l loved broadcasting the rodeo events and even enjoyed selling yachts but it’s hard to sell enough yachts to make a living. I knew I could make money working for a radio station, so that’s why I returned. ”

St. Martin eventually returned to KFIV in 1978 and has been associated with that station ever since. Sunny 102.3 FM is owned by the Texas-based AM/FM lnc. that also controls KFIV, B-93, Mega 96.7 and KJAX in Stockton.

The company, according to St. Martin, is the biggest of its kind in the United States, operating hundreds of stations from coast to coast. It even owns the Texas Rangers baseball team and the Dallas Stars hockey club.

Over the years, he has gone from a traditional news broadcaster. The station caters to women in 29 to 45 year age group but he really doesn’t get involved in the selection of the format.

“l consider myself a ‘rip-and-read’ broadcaster but his three-minute reports are heard on the hour and in an upbeat style of delivery. His broadcasting idol during his early years was Gene D’Accardo, who worked locally during the ’60s, then went to KNBR in San Francisco for many years before returning to KTRB. “He had a natural presence on the air St. Martin added.

Four radio legends from KTRB: Bob Lang, Bob DeLeon, Tim St. Martin, and Derek Waring

St. Martin normally doesn’t do financial, crime or what he calls other depressing news. “If people want those bad things, they can go to another station. That’s just the way I am.”

He ends each newscast with “I’m Tim St. Martin with the information you need, now back to the music you love on Sunny 102.”   It no doubt serves as a wake-up call for thousands of listeners each morning.

The Modesto area, still considered a small market , has been a launching pad for many DJs and radio personalities. Some have gone on to successful careers in television and movies,. Among them are Don lnmus, Les Keider and Stu Nahan.

St. Martin points out that the late Wolfman Jack, despite being featured in “American Graffiti”, never worked for a local station. “He was at XERB, which had it transmitter across the Mexican border and could be heard all over the West Coast and as far away as Alaska.

Tim St. Martin, Rick Myers, and Bob Mohr.  Combined, they worked in radio 130 years! And, they share the same birthday!

The lure of big city lights and big city money never have appealed to the local radio man. “l like it here and wouldn’t want to a major market. Actually Modesto is getting too big. It’s a good place to raise a family., “Now divorced, he has a 28-year-old daughter Amy living in San Diego and 18 year old Cari, who recently graduated from Johansen High School.

Although he says he enjoys his job, there is one thing he has never got use to. It’s the hours. In order to get to work on time, he has to get up at 3:45 AM although he don’t get to bed before 11:00 PM. But he takes naps in the afternoon.

Following a few hours of morning production time, he usually out of the office by noon, “unless a golf match breaks out.” Then he tries to leave a bit early. Golf, which he plays about twice week, and tennis are among his favorite activities. He also plays senior league softball on Thursday nights.

“l am pretty much a home body but I don’t do any cooking. My weakness is fast food restaurants, although I try to stay active and watch my cholesterol.

St. Martin says he’s never given and serious thought to retiring. “I know the day will come but I’m not prepared for it now. Who knows? Maybe I’ll take up fishing.

(Courtesy of ZORCH magazine, Bill Slayter publisher)

Photos:

Tim St. Martin hosts the North 40 Roundup, featuring Janice Allen and the Kenny Pierce band from late 1981.(Video courtesy of Bill Terry”)

Bob DeLeon receives MAMA’s Lifetime Award

Bob DeLeon 2911

The Modesto Area Music Association super MAMA 2011 lifetime achievement award was presented to former Modesto DJ, musician and Modesto Radio Museum board member Bob DeLeon. The presentation was made at ceremonies held at the DoubleTree hotel ballroom on October 13, 2011.

The award, presented by KFIV’s Rick Myers. Among his remarks he said DeLeon could have been one of the characters in the American Graffiti film created by Modesto native George Lucas in 1962. The film was inspired by groups of young people, like DeLeon and Lucas, who cruised 10th and 11th streets in downtown Modesto in the fifties and sixties.

DeLeon began his career in 1959 playing keyboard with the Kent Whitt and the Downbeats band, all fellow students at Modesto high school. The band a stopped performing in 1963, but not until they had performed in a USO tour for troops in Alaska and Asia. The band spent 3 1/2 months touring Vietnam, Taiwan, Korea, Japan, and the Philippines before the breakup started with DeLeon and other members of the band being drafted into military service.

DeLeon, in his remarks, said he made numerous friends while playing with the band, one in particular, a young lady named Ronie, who eventually became his wife.

DeLeon fondly remembers the fifties and sixties and enjoying cruising up and down 10 and 11th streets in downtown Modesto with his friends. After finishing his military commitment, DeLeon became interested in the broadcasting business.

After obtaining a broadcast/operator license in Los Angeles, he returned to Modesto in 1963 and started working at KLOC radio station in Ceres, which had just been put on the air by country musician and media mogul Chester Smith. A few months later, he landed a position at KFIV as an on-the-air personality staying until 1972.

DeLeon moved on to KTRB in the 80’s before eventually making his way into the real estate business working his way up to Vice President of sales and training for Century 21 M&M and Associates Realty in Modesto.

In 2004 DeLeon, and several other veteran radio personalities in the Modesto area, formed the Modesto Radio Museum group dedicated to preserving the history of local radio broadcasting.

At 69, DeLeon lives in Modesto with his wife of 46 years Ronie. They have one daughter and one grandson.

Congratulations Bob!

 

Derek video clip of Solid Gold radio show.

Former K-5 Personality Tom Romano

Tom Roman

Tom was born and raised in Modesto, California. He played in rock bands from high school on! This love of music led him into radio as a DJ: First in Modesto at KFIV and KTRB, then in

Sacramento at KCRA, KWOD and KXOA. Tom was hired at KCRA to do mid-days with his “Italian Love” radio show. He also produced jingles and sound tracks for KCRA TV programming. During that time Tom was involved in some of the first music videos with a group called Biplane. He also managed the Moon Recording Studios.

In 1988 Tom was hired by San Francisco’s KNBR 680, radio home of the San Francisco Giants and Golden State Warriors as an air talent and Director of Creative Services. In 1997 Tom joined KFBK, KGBY, and KHYL as Director of Creative Services and fill-in air talent. Most recently Tom was added to the air staff of Classic 93.1. Tom said “I am very happy to back on the air playing the Classic hits of the 70’s and 80’s. Great station, great people!”

Tom’s Favorite hobbies: Playing guitar, sailing his Hobie Cat catamaran, going to Huey Lewis, Eagle’s and Fleetwood Mac concerts, Sacramento Kings basketball games, and hanging out with his beautiful wife Stephanie and two great daughters Sara and Amanda. He has also been a synchronized swimming judge and the voice of the Cordova Cordettes every summer for the past .

(Courtesy of Classic Rock 93.1)

 

Former K-5 Personality Bob Malik

Derek video clip of Solid Gold radio show.