MICROPHONE MAN-19

Part 19

Altec M11 System.

Altec-Lansing Corporation billed it as “The mike that became a must!” when it came out around 1949. I’m talking about the Altec 21B condenser microphone capsule which was part of the M-11 Microphone system. This capsule was an amazingly small mike for that era.

This mike was a revolutionary development at the time because condenser mikes had fallen out of favor way back in the 1930s. Ribbon and dynamics had taken over the professional audio field and many thought the condenser would never come back. Altec engineers had a different idea…a new approach to the problem: not “redesigning what was already available, but starting from scratch with a dual specification: “The best quality and the smallest size.”

More than 20 “man-years” were spent in the design and engineers of the 21B. The result wasn’t just a “better mike” – smaller in size – but a mike, smaller in diameter than a dime…that set a new standard in microphone performance…with new pickup techniques as well. The condenser mikes of the 1920s and 30s were big and had bulky amplifiers that had to be in close proximity to the pickup capsule and were powered by large battery packs.

The new smaller size capsule mated with the new “miniature” vacuum tubes developed during WWII made possible the come back of the condenser unit. Altec used an A/C power supply box instead of bulky battery packs. The result was the M-11 microphone system. The capsule itself was 5/8ths of an inch in diameter and just a quarter inch thick. It had a sound entrance opening that was a tiny slot around the top edge of the capsule.

People referred to this mike as the “coke-bottle” because of its unique and stylish shape. The small 21B capsule was mounted at the top of the slender “coke-bottle” “150A” base which contained a 6AU6 miniature vacuum tube which converted the very high impedance of the capsule to a low impedance by use of a cathode-follower circuit. The unit used a multi-conductor cable connected through a Cannon “P” 8-pin connector which was at the bottom of the “coke-bottle”. The mike could be separated from the power supply by as much as 400 feet.

This cable mated with the power supply box which supplied both filament and high voltage to the vacuum tube and condenser capsule. The power supply box also had an output cable that connected the system to the audio equipment it was to be used with. There was an optional matching transformer that plugged into the power supply box to provide a balanced output for professional audio systems.

The 21B capsule produced an extremely smooth and extended response over the entire audio range and was omnidirectional. Later modifications were the 21C and D which only changed the way the sound entered the mike at the top. Its graceful, slender shape made it possible for artists to “get out from behind the mike” and be seen with a minimum of obstruction when used on a mike stand and it also fit comfortably in the hand for mobile use.

The M-11 mike system became an instant sensation in the audio industry and saw wide use in broadcasting, public address motion picture production and recording. Later Altec used the same capsule with an even smaller base that used printed circuits and a sub-miniature vacuum tube…this was dubbed the “lipstik” M-20 microphone system. It was literally no larger than a lipstick and was practically invisible on a regular mike stand. It was also equipped with a fountain pen clip so that it could be put on a coat lapel or tie or hidden underneath the tie, corsage or other ornaments.

Altec went on to develop other condenser mikes including uni-directional units. This was the start of the resurgence of the condenser microphone in the US. Shortly after the Altec was introduced the industry saw the importing of the very fine German condenser mikes that continued the condenser comeback. Today condenser mikes of all kinds are used universally in everything from telephones to high end recording. Altec-Lansing was considered one of the premiere electronics manufacturers of the 20th century.

MICROPHONE MAN 18

Part 18

Gates Turntables

Gates Radio Company of Quincy, Illinois was a major manufacturer of broadcast equipment for many decades going back to 1922. In 1957 Gates was bought out by Harris Corporation which kept the Gates name until 1975 when it changed to Harris. Gates, and later under Harris, the company built a full line of equipment for radio including audio and transmitting equipment.

In the late 50s Gates developed a new line of broadcast turntables that used a unique drive system. Most “rim-drive” turntables up to this time were driven on the inner surface of the outer rim. Gates moved the drive mechanism to an inner solid hub nearer the center of the table. This change reduced the rumble to a much lower level due to the lower motor speed requirement.

The newly designed unit had a convenient gear-shift style speed change lever and a silent rocker-type on-off switch. Gates claimed that you could start the table by the switch or the shift knob and either way there would be no jerk or jarring of the stylus on the record.

These beautiful turntables were used in hundreds of radio and TV stations back in that bygone era.
Gates offered a 16 inch and a 12 inch version of these turntables. More and more stations in the late 50s were ditching their older 16 inch tables for the smaller units because there was less need for playing the large old-style transcriptions. The smaller units took up less space in the crowded control rooms. A 12 inch turntable with a longer pickup arm could still play the 16 inch records, if needed.

Gates built some very fine quality equipment that sold for reasonable prices.

MICROPHONE MAN 16

Part 16

There are still a few more high quality broadcast microphones that we have yet to cover in this series of articles on the Modesto Radio Museum website. Shure had a couple of popular mikes with radio broadcasters…the Models SM-5 and SM-7.

The Shure SM-5 [photos 1,2,3] was originally developed in 1966 as a motion picture and TV overhead boom mike. It had a huge foam windscreen and a swivel-yoke bracket that were particularly adapted for this type of use.

But soon radio broadcasters discovered this mike was an excellent model for radio control rooms that gave an announcers voice a full-bodied tone. The big windscreen was also a big advantage in preventing “P” popping and other breath noises when used closeup like most announcers seem to want to do!

The SM-5 was a dynamic cardioid unit with a relatively flat frequency response. With the large foam windscreen removed the mike unit itself is relatively small…and looks similar to the famous Shure SM-57. A later updated version was the SM-5B. I dare say that this mike got far more use in radio than it ever did as a movie or TV boom mike!

Shure ended production of the SM-5 in 1986…but many are still in use in radio stations around the country…and are still in demand on the used equipment market…but they are a rare find! Many radio announcers and engineers wonder why Shure ever decided to discontinue this popular model.

One reason may be that Shure had come out with another mike especially for voice, narration and radio sometime in the 1970s. This mike is the SM7…and it’s later version, the SM-7B. [photos 4,5,6] This mike looks somewhat different from the SM-5 but also has a swivel-yoke type mount and the overall size is somewhat smaller than the SM-5.

The SM-7 has a choice of two foam windscreens, a large one or smaller size, that slip onto the front of the mike. Another feature of this mike is a built-in “graphic” equalizer. Directly on the rear of the mike are two switches one controls the bass or lower frequencies and the other the high frequencies. These can be adjusted to select a bass rolloff or high boost or totally flat response depending on the use.

The SM-7 is also a cardioid dynamic unit that is still being manufactured to this day…and is widely used by many broadcast stations and voice-over artists.

Again we refer you to the excellent microphone website by Dr. Stan Coutant for further details on both these Shure broadcast dynamics. Photos on this page are courtesy of the Coutant website.

KMPH, 840 kHz History

KMPH A.M. 840 kHz Sold To Immaculate Heart Radio
August 1, 2014

Radio station KMPH, 840 KHz Modesto, California, was sold to Immaculate Heart Radio effective August 1, 2014 by owner Harry Pappas of Reno, NV. Pappas dropped their Graffiti Gold music format from the station with the consummation of the agreement and the new owners launched their Catholic talk radio format August 1, 2014. Immaculate Heart Radio stations broadcast authentic Catholic programming 24 hours a day over 31 group owned stations in six states including 15 translators. Stations including KWG, Stockton, KJOP, Lemoore, CA, KHOT, Madera, CA. and KJPG in Bakersfield, CA.

Meanwhile, the KTRB building and property on Norwegian Avenue is still for sale. There’ve been no no offers tendered for the property which was originally listed for sale over a year ago Harry Pappas, owner for $495,000. The price has been reduced $295,000 or best offer.

________________________
Vandals Attack KMPH
August 14, 2013
KMPH’s mobile office/studios located in the parking lot of the former KTRB on Norwegian Ave. in Modesto was struck sometime overnight Wednesday August 14, 2013 by vandals. The responsible’s cut a hole in the chain-link fence that surrounds the property to gain access the mobile office which sits in the parking lot of the former KTRB . They knocked the station off the air by cutting the power to the office and transmission wires connected to the building. No attempt was made to enter the alarmed mobile office itself. Initial damage estimates place a loss of around $500.

David Jackson, program director of the station, discovered the station off the air at 6 AM and contacted station engineer Paul Shinn who discovered the crime when he arrived at the station. The adjacent former KTRB building, which has been vacant for several years, has in the past been broken into several times mostly for copper wiring which was stripped from the interior. KMPH, owned by Harry Pappas of Reno, NV, plans to increase the security of the property. The incident was reported to the Modesto Police Department.

______________________________

KMPH Returns With Graffiti Gold

August 11, 2013

According to Manoli Pappas of the KMPH management team, KMPH has returned to the air with a “Graffiti Gold” music format.
______________________________
KMPH-AM Modesto Being Liquidated
Thursday, March 29, 2012

Pappas Telecasting is liquidating its broadcast holdings, which include TV stations in California, Texas, Arizona and Nebraska and one radio station KMPH-AM (840) in Modesto, CA. KMPH was launched by Harry J. Pappas to replace KTRB-AM (860) which he moved to San Francisco in 2006. KTRB San Francisco is not part of this liquidation. KMPH AM went into receivership when Pappas failed to make a March 26, 2012 “discounted payoff ” which would have allow the stations involved to “re-vest” with him as the original owner. However, lender Comerica Bank failed to receive payment. Pappas had been the initial trustee, managing it on behalf of the creditors. Pappas’ own stock in the company is now being contributed to the Liquidating Trust run by Shubert, under direction of the Federal bankruptcy court in Delaware.

KMPH 840 KHz replaced the original KTRB 860 KHz on July 10, 2006 when the Pappas Company, headed by Harry Pappas, moved KTRB to San Francisco. KMPH failed on August 31, 2010 but returned to the air in August of 2011 carrying Mexican religious programming being fed to the transmitter by satellite from a Texas company. Other than the contract engineer and a maintenance man, there are no local employees. Harry Pappas’s nephew Jim Pappas, a company VP, managed KMPH during the year it was on the air and moved on to hold the same position with KTRB in San Francisco. He currently is an account representative for the Valley Yellow Pages.

( Radio-Info.Com contributed to this story)

Thursday, March 29, 2012

Pappas Telecasting is liquidating its broadcast holdings, which include TV stations in California, Texas, Arizona and Nebraska and one radio station KMPH-AM (840) in Modesto, CA. KMPH was launched by Harry J. Pappas to replace KTRB-AM (860) which he moved to San Francisco in 2006. KTRB San Francisco is not part of this liquidation. KMPH AM went into receivership when Pappas failed to make a March 26, 2012 “discounted payoff ” which would have allow the stations involved to “re-vest” with him as the original owner. However, lender Comerica Bank failed to receive payment. Pappas had been the initial trustee, managing it on behalf of the creditors. Pappas’ own stock in the company is now being contributed to the Liquidating Trust run by Shubert, under direction of the Federal bankruptcy court in Delaware.

KMPH 840 KHz replaced the original KTRB 860 KHz on July 10, 2006 when the Pappas Company, headed by Harry Pappas, moved KTRB to San Francisco. KMPH failed on August 31, 2010 but returned to the air in August of 2011 carrying Mexican religious programming being fed to the transmitter by satellite from a Texas company. Other than the contract engineer and a maintenance man, there are no local employees. Harry Pappas’s nephew Jim Pappas, a company VP, managed KMPH during the year it was on the air and moved on to hold the same position with KTRB in San Francisco. He currently is an account representative for the Valley Yellow Pages.

KMPH A.M. 840 kHz Sold To Immaculate Heart Radio
August 1, 2014

Radio station KMPH, 840 KHz Modesto, California, was sold to Immaculate Heart Radio effective August 1, 2014 by owner Harry Pappas of Reno, NV. Pappas dropped their Graffiti Gold music format from the station with the consummation of the agreement and the new owners launched their Catholic talk radio format August 1, 2014. Immaculate Heart Radio stations broadcast authentic Catholic programming 24 hours a day over 31 group owned stations in six states including 15 translators. Stations including KWG, Stockton, KJOP, Lemoore, CA, KHOT, Madera, CA. and KJPG in Bakersfield, CA.

Meanwhile, the KTRB building and property on Norwegian Avenue is still for sale. There’ve been no no offers tendered for the property which was originally listed for sale over a year ago Harry Pappas, owner for $495,000. The price has been reduced $295,000 or best offer.

________________________
Vandals Attack KMPH
August 14, 2013
KMPH’s mobile office/studios located in the parking lot of the former KTRB on Norwegian Ave. in Modesto was struck sometime overnight Wednesday August 14, 2013 by vandals. The responsible’s cut a hole in the chain-link fence that surrounds the property to gain access the mobile office which sits in the parking lot of the former KTRB . They knocked the station off the air by cutting the power to the office and transmission wires connected to the building. No attempt was made to enter the alarmed mobile office itself. Initial damage estimates place a loss of around $500.

David Jackson, program director of the station, discovered the station off the air at 6 AM and contacted station engineer Paul Shinn who discovered the crime when he arrived at the station. The adjacent former KTRB building, which has been vacant for several years, has in the past been broken into several times mostly for copper wiring which was stripped from the interior. KMPH, owned by Harry Pappas of Reno, NV, plans to increase the security of the property. The incident was reported to the Modesto Police Department.

______________________________

KMPH Returns With Graffiti Gold

August 11, 2013

According to Manoli Pappas of the KMPH management team, KMPH has returned to the air with a “Graffiti Gold” music format.
______________________________
KMPH-AM Modesto Being Liquidated
Thursday, March 29, 2012

Pappas Telecasting is liquidating its broadcast holdings, which include TV stations in California, Texas, Arizona and Nebraska and one radio station KMPH-AM (840) in Modesto, CA. KMPH was launched by Harry J. Pappas to replace KTRB-AM (860) which he moved to San Francisco in 2006. KTRB San Francisco is not part of this liquidation. KMPH AM went into receivership when Pappas failed to make a March 26, 2012 “discounted payoff ” which would have allow the stations involved to “re-vest” with him as the original owner. However, lender Comerica Bank failed to receive payment. Pappas had been the initial trustee, managing it on behalf of the creditors. Pappas’ own stock in the company is now being contributed to the Liquidating Trust run by Shubert, under direction of the Federal bankruptcy court in Delaware.

KMPH 840 KHz replaced the original KTRB 860 KHz on July 10, 2006 when the Pappas Company, headed by Harry Pappas, moved KTRB to San Francisco. KMPH failed on August 31, 2010 but returned to the air in August of 2011 carrying Mexican religious programming being fed to the transmitter by satellite from a Texas company. Other than the contract engineer and a maintenance man, there are no local employees. Harry Pappas’s nephew Jim Pappas, a company VP, managed KMPH during the year it was on the air and moved on to hold the same position with KTRB in San Francisco. He currently is an account representative for the Valley Yellow Pages.

( Radio-Info.Com contributed to this story)

( Radio-Info.Com contributed to this story)

KFIV, KTRB, KMPH Personality Tim St. Martin

Long time Modesto area radio listeners have heard a familiar voice on the local airwaves for more than 30 years — 32 1/2 years to be exact. Tim St. Martin, who began his career at Modesto’s KFIV in the spring of 1967, is still going strong as a disc jockey and news broadcaster at KJSN Sunny 102.3 FM. He shares the morning mike with Gary Michaels and can be heard from 5:30 to 8:30 a.m. Mondays through Fridays.

The 53-year-old DJ, who grew up in Southgate in Southern California and went to broadcasting school in Hollywood, got his first job at KTHO, in South Lake Tahoe.” It was a good learning experience and a lot of fun for a 20-year-old but after one year I was offered a spot at KFIV” St. Martin said.

And so began his local career that very few can match or top, in terms of longevity or hours on the air. By his own estimate, he’s put in “about 20 thousand hours, maybe more.”

Perhaps only the legendary Cal Purviance can claim a longer tenure as an on-air personality. Purviance worked as a newsman and program director at KTRB full-time from 1951 to 1982. Even after retiring, he stayed on part-time until 1990.

Ironically, it was Purviance, who hired St. Martin away from KFIV in 1969 as Tim became KTRB’s newscaster, replacing Art Baker.  Purviance recalls St. Martin as being a “sure-fire” radio man.

“l hired Tim because of his fine on air personality and his nose for news” Purviance said. “He was very articulate and worked well with others. He never insisted on doing things his way only. He was with us a number of years and was a heckuva team player.”

St. Martin left the radio scene for a brief time in the seventies to enter private business. He tried his hand as a professional rodeo announcer and also worked as a yacht salesman in the Delta. But he soon found out that he yearned to get back into radio.

“l loved broadcasting the rodeo events and even enjoyed selling yachts but it’s hard to sell enough yachts to make a living. I knew I could make money working for a radio station, so that’s why I returned. ”

St. Martin eventually returned to KFIV in 1978 and has been associated with that station ever since. Sunny 102.3 FM is owned by the Texas-based AM/FM lnc. that also controls KFIV, B-93, Mega 96.7 and KJAX in Stockton.

The company, according to St. Martin, is the biggest of its kind in the United States, operating hundreds of stations from coast to coast. It even owns the Texas Rangers baseball team and the Dallas Stars hockey club.

Over the years, he has gone from a traditional news broadcaster. The station caters to women in 29 to 45 year age group but he really doesn’t get involved in the selection of the format.

“l consider myself a ‘rip-and-read’ broadcaster but his three-minute reports are heard on the hour and in an upbeat style of delivery. His broadcasting idol during his early years was Gene D’Accardo, who worked locally during the ’60s, then went to KNBR in San Francisco for many years before returning to KTRB. “He had a natural presence on the air St. Martin added.

Four radio legends from KTRB: Bob Lang, Bob DeLeon, Tim St. Martin, and Derek Waring

St. Martin normally doesn’t do financial, crime or what he calls other depressing news. “If people want those bad things, they can go to another station. That’s just the way I am.”

He ends each newscast with “I’m Tim St. Martin with the information you need, now back to the music you love on Sunny 102.”   It no doubt serves as a wake-up call for thousands of listeners each morning.

The Modesto area, still considered a small market , has been a launching pad for many DJs and radio personalities. Some have gone on to successful careers in television and movies,. Among them are Don lmus, Les Keider and Stu Nahan.

St. Martin points out that the late Wolfman Jack, despite being featured in “American Graffiti”, never worked for a local station. “He was at XERB, which had it transmitter across the Mexican border and could be heard all over the West Coast and as far away as Alaska.

Tim, with Rick Myers and Bob Mohr. Combined, 130 years of broadcasting, all sharing the same birthday

 

The lure of big city lights and big city money never have appealed to the local radio man. “l like it here and wouldn’t want to a major market. Actually Modesto is getting too big. It’s a good place to raise a family., “Now divorced, he has a 28-year-old daughter Amy living in San Diego and 18 year old Cari, who recently graduated from Johansen High School.

Although he says he enjoys his job, there is one thing he has never got use to. It’s the hours. In order to get to work on time, he has to get up at 3:45 AM although he don’t get to bed before 11:00 PM. But he takes naps in the afternoon.

Following a few hours of morning production time, he usually out of the office by noon, “unless a golf match breaks out.” Then he tries to leave a bit early. Golf, which he plays about twice week, and tennis are among his favorite activities. He also plays senior league softball on Thursday nights.

“l am pretty much a home body but I don’t do any cooking. My weakness is fast food restaurants, although I try to stay active and watch my cholesterol.

St. Martin says he’s never given and serious thought to retiring. “I know the day will come but I’m not prepared for it now. Who knows? Maybe I’ll take up fishing.

(Courtesy of ZORCH magazine, Bill Slayter publisher)

 

Bob DeLeon receives MAMA’s Lifetime Award

The Modesto Area Music Association super MAMA 2011 lifetime achievement award was presented to former Modesto DJ, musician and Modesto Radio Museum board member Bob DeLeon. The presentation was made at ceremonies held at the DoubleTree hotel ballroom on October 13, 2011.

The award was presented by KFIV’s Rick Myers. Among his remarks he said DeLeon could have been one of the characters in the American Graffiti film created by Modesto native George Lucas in 1962. The film was inspired by groups of young people, like DeLeon and Lucas, who cruised 10th and 11th streets in downtown Modesto in the fifties and sixties.

Bob, accepting his Lifetime Achievement Award at the MAMAS.

DeLeon began his career in 1959 playing keyboard with the Kent Whitt and the Downbeats band, all fellow students at Modesto high school. The band a stopped performing in 1963, but not until they had performed in a USO tour for troops in Alaska and Asia. The band spent 3 1/2 months touring Vietnam, Taiwan, Korea, Japan, and the Philippines before the breakup started with DeLeon and other members of the band being drafted into military service.

DeLeon, in his remarks, said he made numerous friends while playing with the band, one in particular, a young lady named Ronie, who eventually became his wife.

DeLeon fondly remembers the fifties and sixties and enjoying cruising up and down 10 and 11th streets in downtown Modesto with his friends. After finishing his military commitment, DeLeon became interested in the broadcasting business.

Bob doing his show at a remote location. Remotes drew big crowds. Have Turntables, Will Travel.

After obtaining a broadcast/operator license in Los Angeles, he returned to Modesto in 1963 and started working at KLOC radio station in Ceres, which had just been put on the air by country musician and media mogul Chester Smith. A few months later, he landed a position at KFIV as an on-the-air personality staying until 1972.

DeLeon moved on to KTRB  before eventually making his way into the real estate business working his way up to Vice President of sales and training for Century 21 M&M and Associates Realty in Modesto.

In front of K-5, 1972. Bob is second from the left.

In 2004 DeLeon, and several other veteran radio personalities in the Modesto area, formed the Modesto Radio Museum group dedicated to preserving the history of local radio broadcasting.

Bob DeLeon lives in Modesto with his wife of 46 years Ronnie. They have one daughter and one grandson.

 

Congratulations Bob!

Video:  Watch Bob’s acceptance speech .Derek video clip of Solid Gold radio show.

KFIV Personality Tom Romano

Tom was born and raised in Modesto, California. He played in rock bands from high school on! This love of music led him into radio as a DJ: First in Modesto at KFIV and KTRB, then in

Sacramento at KCRA, KWOD and KXOA. Tom was hired at KCRA to do mid-days with his “Italian Love” radio show. He also produced jingles and sound tracks for KCRA TV programming. During that time Tom was involved in some of the first music videos with a group called Biplane. He also managed the Moon Recording Studios.

In 1988 Tom was hired by San Francisco’s KNBR 680, radio home of the San Francisco Giants and Golden State Warriors as an air talent and Director of Creative Services. In 1997 Tom joined KFBK, KGBY, and KHYL as Director of Creative Services and fill-in air talent. Most recently Tom was added to the air staff of Classic 93.1. Tom said “I am very happy to back on the air playing the Classic hits of the 70’s and 80’s. Great station, great people!”

Tom’s Favorite hobbies: Playing guitar, sailing his Hobie Cat catamaran, going to Huey Lewis, Eagle’s and Fleetwood Mac concerts, Sacramento Kings basketball games, and hanging out with his beautiful wife Stephanie and two great daughters Sara and Amanda. He has also been a synchronized swimming judge and the voice of the Cordova Cordettes every summer for the past .

 

 

 

Derek video clip of Solid Gold radio show.

KFIV Personality Bob Malik

Bob Malik is a former Modesto resident and KFIV radio personality. After leaving Modesto Bob had a successful radio career. He now lives with his family in Southern California. Bob has just the thing you need on Sunday afternoons. Join him on KRVR, 105.5. If you’re out of the area you can stream it. THE BEATLE YEARS (4pm, Sundays).

  Bob  was recently asked to provide a short bio for the Modesto, CA Central Catholic High School (CCHS) Alumni Magazine. He has graciously given us permission to use it on The Modesto Radio Museum site.)

-0-
By Bob Malik 
Bob Malik, from Modesto to Major Market fame!
It was tough trying to condense a 47 year career into a page. But, here goes.
I began my career in radio shortly after graduating from Central Catholic High School in 1971— It was Central’s 2nd
graduating class.
During my senior year I had garnered enough school credits to earn a half day school schedule. I would leave Central around noon, and drive to Modesto Junior College, where I was taking Radio classes.
In the summer of 1971, I went to a broadcasting prep school in Huntington Beach, Ca. Shortly after returning to Modesto in the fall, I got my 1st radio job. I was hired by Program Director John Chappell to be the weekend DJ at KFIV.
It proved to be a critically important opportunity. The supportive staff at the station included my Central Catholic High School classmate and friend, Chet Haberle. That positive environment only served to inspire me to pursue this path.
From there, I worked at radio stations in Sacramento, San Diego and San Francisco, where I was fortunate enough to become Program Director at K-101. I found myself in the unlikely situation of advising the people I grew up listening to how to do their jobs. That was something I really hadn’t anticipated. But, it turned out to be a winning team. We were able to take the station to #1. I also spent a few  years at the radio station many of us listened to in high school— KFRC.
In 2001, I was offered a job as News Director at CBS Radio’s flagship station in Los Angeles— one year after I had retired from radio. And, that offer came from someone I had hired— 20 years earlier. I would end up staying at K-EARTH for a dozen years.
In 2004, I began hosting a nationally syndicated radio program called The Beatle Years. Which would eventually lead to an interview with Ringo Starr.
In 2015, I got a phone call from Capitol Records. Ringo Starr was about to release his new album, “Postcards From Paradise”. His rep said Ringo had heard The Beatle Years, and they wanted to know if I would be interested  in doing an interview. I told him- I would think about it….Just kidding!
Ringo Starr and The Radio Star!
After I got up off the floor, I said “Are you serious?” “Of course I want to interview Ringo!”. I met the drummer inside the Capitol Records building in Hollywood. Was it all a bit surreal? Yes, it sure was!
The Beatles appeared on the Ed Sullivan show on February 9, 1964. Less than 80 days after the assassination of President Kennedy. That performance was a pivotal moment in American pop culture. It pulled this nation out of a deep depression. We went from black and white—to color. Overnight.
Even though Ringo Starr was one of those 4 guys who changed the world—he was very kind, unassuming —and, well… shorter than I expected. He wanted to talk more about his new album instead of The Beatles. However, I did get a few questions answered about the band. And, I sure didn’t expect to ever see him again.
But, last summer they called again —with an invitation to Ringo’s 77th birthday party on July 7th.  Yes, he turned 77 on 7/7.  I was able to sit down for another one-on-one with him. This time, he answered all of the Beatle questions I wanted to ask. My final question: “How would you like to be remembered, Ringo?”—-His answer?  “I’d like to be remembered .… as being taller”
When the interview was over—he said, “Come here, brother” and gave me a hug. It was an unforgettable day.
My advice to current CCHS students:  Discover what you truly love. Then, pursue your dream. It will make your career so much easier—and, more meaningful. And, pass along the inspiration you’ve received from others. (Who knows– you may run into someone you haven’t heard from…in 20 years!)

News Delivery

How News Was Delivered  to radio stations
Anyone who worked in radio or TV stations prior to the computer and satellite era,  which began in the early ’80s,  will remember how the news they delivered on-the-air reached them. The gathering and reporting of the news by radio has come a long ways since the beginning of broadcasting.
 
In the “old days” the news,  supplied by reporters around the world,  was fed to radio stations around the country primarily by telephone data and voice lines  (teletype machines and voice networks.).  Many stations were affiliated with a major network like NBC, CBS, ABC, & Mutual, to name a few, which was delivered by a newsreaders over network lines.
 
Additionally, stations received news via teletype networks including United Press and Associated Press  and local news copy which was prepared and delivered from local stations as depicted in the photos below of the KTRB  newsroom in the  60’s.
 
Today,  satellites have become the transport method and computers greatly assist the newsreaders delivering the news on-the-air.
 

OGDEN’S Radio School

Compiled by Bob Pinheiro

    ROES CLASS 1958

The FCC First Class Radio Telephone (First Phone)  examination was a very difficult test and required many hours of study to pass. The William B. Ogden Radio Operational School (ROES)  was established in 1946 in Burbank, CA. offering a standard course of study lasting over a period of several months. However, at the request of broadcasters,  and to meet the high demand for first class licensed operators, owner Bill Ogden  converted  his standard course  in 1949 to a  concentrated course  (cram course) of 6- 8 weeks,  12-16 hours a day, seven days a week.

Thora, Bill and Tally.

Bill was the main instructor, his wife Tally and her sister Thora ran the office and Major (the collie) offered encouragement.

In 1966 the school moved to Huntington Beach, CA with the first class being held in the summer of that year.  The school continued to operate until 1973 or 1974 when the FCC deregulated license requirements and Bill announced his retirement.

If you are an Ogden grad, please read and sign our guestbook and relive those memorable days at the William B. Ogden Radio Engineering School.

Much of the information here was contributed by  many of the students from across the country who know they were lucky to be a student of William B. Ogden.   We are particularly pleased to locate and contact Bill’s  niece Patty Porter  and  nephew Jim McDonald who contributed information and photo’s of Bill, Tally and Thora.   Thank you very much.

Now sit back and enjoy  this trip and memories of the William B. Ogden Radio Operational school.